Bosnian Refugees Bail Out of St. Louis

The refugee industry is everywhere these days claiming that one of the most important reasons to import hundreds of thousands of refugees is that they revitalize crumbling cities.

We need refugees to save dying cities!

In fact,. as I write this US refugee resettlement contractors, hoping to pressure Donald Trump to set a high ceiling for refugee admissions for FY2020 (which begins October 1 of this year), are hammering the big lie—refugees save dying cities.

Bashing Trump….

Here is just one example, the Washington Post recently published an opinion piece by two leaders of World Relief (one of nine federally-funded refugee contractors) claiming just that and saying the Trump is hurting cities by reducing the numbers of impoverished refugees being admitted to the US.

But, get this, the New York Times ,in an extensive expose in August, tells us that yes, Bill Clinton’s Bosnians did bring some economic revitalization to St. Louis, but it didn’t last.  The primary reason for the unfolding failure—Democrat-run cities are crime infested.  (There has been no Republican mayor in St. Louis since 1949.)

The New York Times:

‘It’s Not the Same’: Why War Refugees Who Helped Revive St. Louis Are Leaving

[Article opens with some economic success stories.  BTW, a large number of Bosnians are Muslims.]

For St. Louis, a city that had bled population for decades — it had about 400,000 residents in 1990, down from more than 800,000 in the 1950s — the influx of what was estimated to be the largest population of Bosnians outside Bosnia seemed to work magic. For the first time in generations, the urban narrative of abandoned houses, stagnant business and vanishing people appeared to be changing.

But it didn’t last.

Today, St. Louis, like some other Midwestern cities, is battling a new round of contraction, with a stagnant economy, challenged schools and one of the highest murder rates in the country. And over the past few years, the people who fled brutal violence and concentration camps in their homeland and created Little Bosnia have been fleeing again, to the suburbs.

The beginning of the end for the Bosnian community of St. Louis and the melting pot myth was the murder of a Bosnian young man by a gang of thugs.  See my 2014 post about the murder.

Black and Hispanic teens sentenced to long prison terms for Begic’s murder. The NYT never mentions who the killers were.

A deadly hammer attack in Bevo Mill — in which Zemir Begic, a young Bosnian man out with his fiancée, was killed by four teenagers — shook the community in 2014. Bosnians marched in the streets, arguing that the police had not done enough to keep the neighborhood safe.

[….]

Similar stories have been playing out in American cities since the Baby Boom decades of the 20th century, and have proven hard to reverse. After mass flights to the suburbs, even heavy investment in urban centers, with shiny new business districts and rapidly changing downtowns, have often failed to help cities, particularly in the Midwest, replace the residents they had lost.

In St. Louis the process has been particularly painful, because the people who were fleeing were the very ones who had been seen as saviors.

[….]

At its peak in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the Bosnian population, including American-born Bosnians, reached about 70,000 in the city of St. Louis and the surrounding county, according to the International Institute of St. Louis, a charitable agency that sponsors many of the region’s refugees. Now, with some Bosnians having left the state entirely, the agency estimates that the figure is less than 50,000.

Continue reading here.

The International Institute of St. Louis is a subcontractor of the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI), but you can bet USCRI is still peddling the myth that refugees will save dying cities—maybe for a few years in the case of industrious Bosnians, but it won’t happen at all with extremely impoverished Africans.

 

 

Minneapolis: Special High School for Immigrants Cries the Blues as Somali Enrollment Drops

“I feel hurt by the fact that a specific demographic at Wellstone has been taken away from us.”

(Aimee Fearing, former Wellstone principal)

When I read this story at Minnesota Public Radio I couldn’t help but think about buggy whips.  You know the expression about how as times change, so too do industries when the demand for certain commodities disappears.

But, the big difference is that with government programs, those benefiting certain people personally (with jobs etc.), instead of dying a natural death, taxpayer dollars are found to keep the government equivalent of the buggy whip industry alive.

At one time Wellstone High School, a special school for immigrants, was 65% Somali, today it is 30%, and those benefiting from the refugee industry generally in Minnesota are crying the blues.

 

From NPR:

As refugee admissions hit record low, one Minneapolis school fights to adapt

[Big opening section featuring a Somali success story to appeal to readers’ emotions before launching into the difficulties ahead for a special school for special people.]

For nearly two decades now, Wellstone has served as a training ground for hundreds of young refugee and immigrant students, many of whom grew up to be economists, health professionals and engineers — even as its population has fluctuated with each stroke of a presidential pen that expanded or reduced refugee admissions to the United States.

In recent years, though, not many people like Mah are entering the country because of the Trump administration’s crackdown on immigration and the sharp reduction in refugee admissions. As a result, Wellstone is bracing for one of the lowest student enrollment years in its history.

But it’s not just Wellstone that’s witnessing the ripple effect of the dwindling number of refugees entering the country. Refugee-serving agencies in Minnesota have also seen a dramatic decline in the number of refugees coming to their doorsteps for resettlement services.

Here it is—they must keep the infrastructure alive—another way of saying that they must keep the taxpayer dollars flowing their way!

Former Principal Aimee Fearing

To keep the infrastructure alive, Wellstone and service agencies are finding new ways to adapt to the changing refugee-services landscape — by shifting resources and tapping into new demographics.

Donald Trump is to blame….

After he took office in 2017, the president followed through with many of his promises. For example, he barred people from certain predominantly Muslim nations, including Somalia, from entering the U.S. and reduced refugee admissions to the lowest level since the program was created in 1980.

Those restrictions have affected the refugee stream to Minnesota, which for years has been one of the top states for refugee resettlement. More than 3,000 primary refugees arrived in Minnesota in 2016, but only 1,000 came in 2017, and 660 last year, according to figures from the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

The dramatic reduction in refugee admissions will be felt this school year at Wellstone, where the student population has dropped from 400 four years ago to 180 now, according to school counselor Ali Kofiro.

[….]

Though the students at the school have come from all over the world, including East Africa, Southeast Asia, Central America and Mexico, Somalis typically were the majority. In 2015 and 2016, for instance, 65 percent of the students were Somalis. Today, that number is less than 30 percent.

“I feel hurt by the fact that a specific demographic at Wellstone has been taken away from us,” said Aimee Fearing, former Wellstone principal who now serves as the executive director of K-12 academic programming at Minneapolis Public Schools.

For Deqa Muhidin, an ESL teacher at Wellstone, the shrinking number of refugee arrivals hangs as a question mark over the future of the school. “Our school’s future will definitely be up in the air,” said Muhidin. “And my role will definitely be up in the air.”

[….]

The reduction in refugee admissions is also affecting nonprofit organizations and resettlement agencies that often rely on serving refugees to get funding.

Continue reading here.  It is a long article, but useful especially for Minnesotans as it goes on to discuss the refugee contractors operating in the state and how they are adjusting (or not!) to the loss of much federal funding.

Endnote: One wonders about assimilation if the immigrant kids are kept separate and treated as special people in their own special school.

Trump rudely fires only cabinet member doing anything to seriously halt the migrant “invasion”

Did the Open Borders Republicans looking for cheap labor finally persuade the President to unceremoniously dump the only man (probably in all of America!) who knew the nuts of bolts of immigration law and who had fought for decades to put America first when it came to the demographic makeup of the country?

jeff Sessions
As a former Senator, Jeff Sessions was by far the greatest fighter in Washington for an Americans first view of immigration, and I will go so far as to say—Trump would not have been elected without Sessions’ early and tireless support on the issue that most animated voters.

As long time readers know, I believe only one issue matters—IMMIGRATION and our ability to say who comes in to the country and when.

Tariffs, health care, the Russia investigation and even the economy are of little concern if our borders are open and our security is gone.

Demography is destiny and I now have doubts about whether President Donald Trump is serious about getting immigration under control.

Was the whole midterm election campaign focus on the caravan and the border, just a stunt?

If it wasn’t, then how do you fire the man, without even a meeting to thank him for his service—the man who was enforcing our immigration laws for arguably the first time ever?

Here is John Binder at Breitbart on Sessions:

7 Times Jeff Sessions Triumphed for Trump’s ‘America First’ Agenda

In a second report, Binder interviewed Ann Coulter who told Binder, there is “obviously no one” left to enforce immigration law in the president’s cabinet.

And, if you need more proof about how AG Sessions had your back, yesterday the ACLU called him the worst attorney general in history.

 

Readers, I am done. 

I’ve put in over 11 years writing here almost daily and I am going to take a break.

There could be more tinkering with the US Refugee Admissions Program (the primary focus of RRW) while Trump is in office, however, the chance for either removing the Refugee Act of 1980 from the books or seriously reforming it in the next few years died on Tuesday when the Democrats took the House.

I’ve written 9,469 posts since July 2007 and so there is a lot of material here. (If you are searching for something just enter a few key words into the search window.)

I plan to continue tweeting, especially on the European invasion because I think the ‘demography is destiny’ truth has really sunk in there, and the fight to save western civilization is going to be increasingly fierce.

Thanks to all of my readers for your continued loyalty and support over the years.

Who knows, maybe Trump will prove me wrong and I’ll calm down in a few weeks. But, right now I’m tired.

Is Minnesota lost? That has to be the question many are asking this morning

I woke up this morning with my head spinning about the results nationwide, and couldn’t at first figure out where to dive in to tell you what I think about the midterm election results.

Over time, I’ll have more to say about what it all means, but I do know this—there will be no legislative reform of the US Refugee Admissions Program in the next two years.

Now that the House is controlled by the Dems, that means that each committee will revert to Democrat control.  And, they will never open for review the Refugee Act of 1980.

Screenshot (1510)
Minnesota not-so-nice power duo: Keith Ellison with US Senator Amy Klobuchar (will she run for Prez in 2020?)

Any further reform of the refugee program will have to come from the White House and if I were a betting person, I would bet that they have done about all they will do before 2020 which is to keep the numbers low.

Enough of that, I could be wrong.

As for my friends in Minnesota, don’t get angry at me for asking, but was outgoing governor Dayton right when he famously said in 2015, if you don’t like immigrants find another state?

See my post yesterday on Minnesota.

Here is just one of many stories this morning from Minnesota with Keith Ellison, the state’s new Attorney General saying—-if you mess with Minnesota we will fight back. Which sounds like a veiled threat to silence speech.

From The Minnesota Sun:

Keith Ellison Defeats Doug Wardlow Completing DFL Sweep of Statewide Offices

An emotional Keith Ellison took the stage at St. Paul’s Crowne Plaza hotel late Tuesday night to deliver his victory speech after defeating Republican Doug Wardlow in the race for Minnesota’s Attorney General Office.

The race has been a constant source of controversy on both sides of the aisle, though Republicans were hopeful that Ellison’s past affiliations as well as a domestic-abuse allegation made against him by an ex-girlfriend would keep him from winning the state’s top law-enforcement job.

Polls frequently showed a tight race with large numbers of undecided voters, but Ellison managed to squeak out a victory over Warldow, winning 49 percent of the vote compared to Wardlow’s 44 percent.

Ellison began his victory speech by praising the Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) Party as one based on the “values of love, respect, transparency, and accountability.”

[….]

“We don’t care who it is—if anybody is messing with somebody in Minnesota, your Minnesota attorney general is going to stand up for them and fight back,” he concluded. “Tonight is a good night. Every statewide elected official is a Democrat in Minnesota.”

More here.

Minnesotans, tell me what you think by commenting to this post.  Send me links to other news from the state in the wake of the midterm election.

Minnesota Muslims “waking up” and expect to make gains in voting today

From NPR:

Muslims Hope To ‘Wake Up’ At The Ballot Box This Year

On a recent Saturday afternoon in an office in St. Paul, Minn., a flurry of calls went out to Native American and Latinos voters reminding them to vote Nov. 6. And there was a new group added to the list: Muslims.

Until last year, ISAIAH, a multi-racial coalition of faith communities in Minnesota, was mostly made up of churches. Now, 24 mosques have joined the voter turnout effort. The group is focused on getting communities of color to vote this year in reaction to what it describes as politics of fear and a rise of white nationalism.

 

Ellison and Imam Asad Zaman
Pals! Imam Asad Zaman (left) with Rep. Keith Ellison.  Will Ellison be Minnesota’s next Attorney General after today?

 

With Muslims and immigrants used as boogeymen in political rhetoric, Imam Asad Zaman, executive director of the Muslim American Society of Minnesota, said, getting his community to the ballot box is vital. Zaman is leading the local Muslim effort to get out the vote and has been a leader on political engagement in the community for more than 15 years.

And there are more Muslims now running for office, hoping to be part of a “blue wave.” In Minnesota, nine Muslims are on the ballot for state, federal and local offices.

“Many candidates running for office are using Islamophobia as a means to get to political power. That is absolutely un-American,” Zaman said. “The community is under assault. Fortunately, most of us are beginning to wake up.”

The community is under assault. Fortunately, most of us are beginning to wake up.

(Imam Asad Zaman)

He points out that in Minnesota there are 50,000 registered Muslim voters. Though Muslims make up a small voting bloc — they’re about one percent of the nation’s population — those votes can matter in close elections. Many feel a renewed sense of urgency to choose leaders that will represent them.

[….]

About two-thirds of Muslim voters identify as Democrats according to the Pew Research Center and about 13 percent as Republican.

Muslim populations growing in key battleground states

“What’s interesting is that they are clustered in key areas including battleground states such as Virginia, Florida, Michigan, Ohio and especially in urban areas,” Alzayat says. “So, for example you have about 120,000 registered Muslim voters in the state of Michigan. You have about 120,000 registered in Florida. You have about 100,000 registered in Virginia and those numbers really matter because in close elections … just a few votes can make a difference let alone tens of thousands, if not 100,000.”

It is a long ‘glowing’ story, read more here.

I have a huge Minnesota archive, go here if you have some time to read!