After Maryland Judge’s Decision, What is Next?

I don’t know.  I guess we wait for the Justice Department’s response to the decision that halted the President’s first effort to reform the US Refugee Admissions Program.

Here is a brief statement from the White House immediately after learning of the decision.

Another lawless district court has asserted its own preferred immigration policy in place of the laws of the United States – and, in so doing, robbed millions of American citizens of their voice and their say in a vital issue directly affecting their communities. President Trump rightly and justly recognized that your communities are unique, and while some cities have the resources to adequately support refugees and help them be successful, not all communities can sustain the substantial and costly burden. Knowing that, the Trump Administration fulfilled a key promise by giving States and localities a seat at the table in deciding whether or not refugees will be placed in your communities. In addition, under the Refugee Act of 1980, Congress explicitly afforded the President authority over the refugee resettlement process, including by taking local consultation into account. This is a preposterous ruling, one more example of nationwide district court injunctions run amok, and we are expeditiously reviewing all options to protect our communities and preserve the integrity of the refugee resettlement process.

So what happens to the Executive Order and the process it spawned to obtain consents, or non-consents, for the placement of refugees in states and counties?  I’m assuming it all grinds to a halt for now.

Daniel Horowitz at Conservative Review suggests that the President is a lame duck right now if he doesn’t challenge these rogue court decisions, see here.

News reports are coming in about how county elected officials are sighing with relief that they don’t have to go on record as for or against refugee arrivals for their towns and cities because of the court ruling.

Why did my Republican governor cave and consent to taking on an extra burden for taxpayers and more social/cultural unrest by telling the Dept. of State to send more refugees?

That is a question I got from a reader this morning.

Many reasons (pick one, or more!):

~Fear of being called an unwelcoming racist.

~He/she was getting pressure from groups on the religious Left (including the contractors) many of which financially benefit from refugee arrivals, or will benefit because they are Leftists who see a new voting block. Many are one-worlders working to destroy national sovereignty.

In some states CAIR was active (Minnesota and Maryland for sure) with their usual hammer—any gov who said no would surely be called an Islamophobe.

~Pressure from the Chamber of Commerce and their ilk which wants more refugees because refugees need housing and buy cars.

~Lobbying (and likely campaign donations) from large corporations including, global corporations that need the steady supply of cheap subservient labor—BIG MEAT and BIG POULTRY, for example.

And, I’m sure there are other less obvious reasons.

But, most importantly the governor knew that there were more in his/her state on the side of inviting refugees than there are of you who want to see the program constrained or flat out abolished.

Now that isn’t so everywhere. Here is a story from Tennessee yesterday about how one county commission struggled with the decision and ultimately did nothing on the same day that the Maryland judge slapped the President down.

It is an opinion piece (for more refugees) critical of the non-action taken at a county meeting this week. One line jumped out at me, from the Chattanooga Times Free Press as the reason the meeting ended with no action:

Their reticence to vote for the resolution, like Coppinger’s, was likely born because, as the mayor said, “you cannot overcome social media.”

Clearly the opposition to more refugees being placed in Hamilton County was of sufficient magnitude to at least stop the consent train.

The opposition to more resettlement in Tennessee may be the strongest and best organized in the nation.  The problem is every state doesn’t have the grassroots network that Tennessee has developed over the years.

We have to change that, if we expect to do battle with the juggernaut of Leftwing/Dems working with big business interests and RINO governors that are changing America by changing the people.

But, your first order of business is to buy more time by getting Donald Trump re-elected.

Send me an e-mail with the subject line, grassroots organizing, and I’ll try to put you together with others in your state.

RefugeeWatcher@gmail.com

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