Finland begins to close the door to refugees

While Sweden still lives in la-la land, the Finnish people are not so naive….

Although Finland didn’t take very many refugees to begin with, I wonder if that brutal murder committed allegedly by a Somali in a small town pub had anything to do with Finnish feelings toward asylum seekers.

American readers take note, in Finland, communities have a say about taking refugees while in America the State Department and its contractors are constantly scouting out new and unsuspecting towns and you will get refugees dropped off with little notice if you aren’t continually on watch.

From Sputnik International:

Finnish municipalities have significantly cut quotas on receiving refugees from foreign countries.

Tundra Tabloids has been following the migration (the Hijra) to Scandinavia for years. http://tundratabloids.com/2011/06/somalis-in-finland-complain-over-tightening-rules-on-unification.html

Refugee quotas have significantly been reduced by Finnish municipalities, with just 40 of them signaling readiness to receive refuges, local media outlets reported.

Last year, the municipalities received more than 1,000 refugees, a record number that experts attributed to additional government funding and the Syrian conflict.

In addition, Finland increased the quota for refugees from 750 to over a thousand.

This year, the refugee quota stands at 1050, but it is unlikely to be implemented in time.

Meanwhile, the regions of Satakunta and South Ostrobothnia have said that they will not receive refugees this year.

[….]

People fleeing Syria remain refugees of choice for Finnish municipalities, while refugees from the Democratic Republic of Congo are reportedly the most unwelcome people.

This last line is very interesting!  Apparently Finns are still o.k. with Syrians, but one of the UNHCR’s newest big resettlement pushes—for those from the Democratic Republic of Congo—is getting a cold reception.  American readers know that we are expected to receive most of the 50,000 from DR Congo within five years (we are already into that five year resettlement plan).

For our previous posts on Finland, click here.  Our entire ‘Invasion of Europe’ series is here.

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